Dr. Dhanshree R Gunjawate

Assistant Professor (Senior Scale)

Department of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (at Mangalore)

CURRENT ACADEMIC ROLE & RESPONSIBILITIES

    • Teaching: Undergraduate and Post graduate students
    • Clinical supervision and patient care
    • Internship coordinator
    • Incharge of voice lab
    • Guide: Conference presentations/Clinical & Journal clubs 
    • Eligible Ph.D guide under MAHE

SUBJECTS CURRENTLY TEACHING

Subject Subject code Semester
Voice and its disorders B 3.1 Third Semester BASLP
Speech Science and Production SH 102 First semester - M.Sc Speech Language Pathology)
Anatomy and physiology of Speech and Hearing B 1.2 First semester BASLP
Voice: Science and Disorders SLP 202 Second semester - M.Sc (Speech Language Pathology)
Practical in Speech Language Pathology SLP 401 Fourth semester - M.Sc (Speech Language Pathology)

ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS

Degree Specialisation Institute Year of passing
Doctorate in Philosophy in Speech and Hearing Speech Language Pathology School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University 2017
MASLP Speech & Hearing School of Allied Health Sciences, Manipal University 2013
BASLP Speech and Hearing Ali Yavar Jung National Institute of Speech and Hearing Disabilities 2011

Experience

Institution / Organisation Designation Role Tenure
Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, KMC Mangalore Assistant Professor (Senior Scale) Teaching, Research, Clinical Management Nov 2020 - till date
Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, KMC Mangalore Assistant Professor Teaching, Research, Clinical Management Oct 2017 - Oct 2020

AREAS OF INTEREST, EXPERTISE AND RESEARCH

Area of Interest

Voice, Speech disorders, Speech Science

Area of Expertise

Voice, Speech Science

Area of Research

Voice, Pediatric Audiology

Professional Affiliations & Contributions

  • Member of Rehabilitation Council of India (RCI), 2016
  • Member of Indian Speech and Hearing Association (ISHA), 2016.
  • Member of Dakshin Karnataka Indian Speech and Hearing Association (DKISHA), 2016.

21-04-2020 Dhanshree R Gunjawate Radish Kumar B Rohit Ravi Lakshmi S Kunnath

Background: During the transition process, transgender individuals may require voice and communication services. Speech-language pathologists are increasingly involved in rendering clinical services and assisting transgender clients in voice and communication therapy. Previous studies in different countries have highlighted the lack of competence expressed by the speech-language pathologists toward serving the members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer communities. Presently, no such findings are available in the Indian context. Thus, a need was felt for identifying the concerns toward treatment for transgender individuals in speech-language pathology settings in India.

Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the knowledge, comfort levels and attitudes of speech-language pathologists practicing in India regarding the transgender community.

Method: An online survey method was used to assess the knowledge and attitudes among speech-language pathologists working in India toward the transgender community.

Results: The findings of the study revealed higher comfort levels as compared to self-rated knowledge levels in addressing issues related to transgender healthcare. Evidence-based practices toward transgender healthcare emerged as the topic needing more information. The study also helped to identify several moral beliefs and practices for voice therapy for the transgender population.

Conclusion: There is a strong need to educate the speech language pathologists toward transgender healthcare in order to promote better cultural competence. The findings of the present study help to identify the lacunae in knowledge as well as to highlight the need to have continuing education programs in this area.

International Journal of Transgender Health, 2020, Vol 21, 455-462

Knowledge and attitudes toward transgender community among speech-language pathologists in India: A questionnaire-based exploration

5-2-2020 Dhanshree R Gunjawate Rohit Ravi Srividya Bhagawan

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the Kannada version of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V).

Method

The Kannada version of CAPE-V comprises six phrases that are phonetically designed as per the CAPE-V requirements. Sixty-five (21 individuals with dysphonia and 44 asymptomatic) participants were enrolled for the instrument psychometric validation. The interrater and intrarater reliability as well as validity were assessed.

Results

High level of agreement was noted between the three raters across all the CAPE-V parameters, highest for pitch (intraclass correlation coefficient value = .98) and lowest for loudness (intraclass correlation coefficient value = .96). High intrarater reliability agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient value > .97) was also noted for all the parameters. Among the correlation for parameters that are comparable between CAPE-V and the Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, and Strain scale, the highest correlation was noted for overall severity. There was a significant difference noted between the study and control groups for all parameters except loudness. The discriminant function analysis and classification revealed that 98% were correctly identified.

Conclusion

The Kannada version of CAPE-V has been proven to be a psychometrically reliable and valid tool to use for auditory-perceptual evaluation of voice.

Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 2020, Vol 63, 385-392

Parent reported barriers and facilitators towards cochlear implantation – A systematic review

12/6/2020 Rohit Ravi Dhanshree R Gunjawate

Context

Early identification and intervention of hearing loss at a young age leads to long term benefits from language, communication, social, educational and financial aspects. Cochlear implantation is a widely recommended rehabilitation option for hearing loss. The process of cochlear implantation is a long one and the role played by parents is crucial.

Objective

The present systematic review was carried out with the aim of identifying the different parent reported barriers towards cochlear implantation.

Data sources

PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Scopus and Cochrane Library.

Study selection

Studies in parent reported barriers towards cochlear implantation screened and identified using 3 stages by 2 reviewers. Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool was used to carry out the quality appraisal of included studies.

Data extraction

Outcome measures related to barriers and facilitators.

Results

Nineteen studies were identified and included in the present review which discussed the parent reported barriers based on themes such as service delivery, social issues, time related, device/surgery, financial, child related and others. The different factors that facilitated the process included availability of resources, finances, child related and parental.

Conclusion

The present review was a novel attempt at exploring the different parent reported barriers towards cochlear implantation. The facilitators, which can be used to overcome these barriers, will be useful for making the process smoother.

International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 2020, Vol 136, 110163.

A Pilot Survey of Warm-Up Practices and Perceptions Among Indian Classical Singers

1/1/2020 Dhanshree R Gunjawate

Objective

Studies have highlighted the importance of having an adequate vocal warm-up exercise regime for prevention of vocal fold injury among singers. Indian classical singing has several singing exercises aimed at improving vocal range and voice. Thus, a need was felt to survey these singers for the warm-up practices they follow and their perception about them.

Study Design

Cross-sectional study design.

Methods

A 20-item questionnaire was used comprising of questions on demographic details, vocal warm-up singing, and nonsinging-based practices, perceptions about importance of vocal warm-up, and perceptions about effects of vocal warm-up on voice.

Results and Conclusion

Fifty Indian classical singers were surveyed. Sixty-four percent of them used vocal warm-up on a daily basis, whereas the remaining did it weekly. Among the singing-based vocal warm-ups, a combination of different singing notes and scales were most commonly used. The popular nonsinging-based warm-up exercises were breathing practice, humming, and meditation. Overall, the singers had a positive perception of the importance of vocal warm-up. Notably, 94% agreed to the importance of having a vocal warm-up regularly before singing. The findings of the present study will help in understanding the existing vocal warm-up regime and perception of the singers. It will benefit counseling singers regarding vocal hygiene, voice care, and management.

Journal of Voice, 2020, Vol 34, pg 156.e15-156.e18

Effect of diabetes mellitus on voice: a systematic review

01-10-2019 Rohit Ravi Dhanshree R Gunjawate

A systematic review of literature was conducted to identify the influence of diabetes mellitus on voice. The search was carried out on PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL and Cochrane databases. Articles that discussed the effect of diabetes mellitus on voice were included in the review. Five studies were found to be suitable for inclusion. There is limited literature available on the effect of diabetes mellitus on voice. The studies pointed to a higher prevalence (12.5%) of voice problems among individuals with diabetes mellitus as compared to the general population, and higher gastro-oesophageal reflux disorder related symptoms. Further, higher reflux symptom index and voice handicap index scores have been reported in these individuals. The other voice related changes reported across the studies include the presence of laryngeal involvement, hoarseness, and increased strained voice. Even though there is limited literature available, it points towards the presence of voice changes among people with diabetes. This information would help professionals to better counsel and refer patients with diabetes to laryngologists or voice therapists if they complain of voice changes.

Pratical Diabetes, 2019, Vol 36, Pg 177-180

Adaptation and Validation of the Kannada Singing Voice Handicap Index-10

01-07-2019 Dhanshree R Gunjawate Venkataraja Aithal U B. Rajashekhar

Objective: The aim of the present study was to adapt and validate the English version of the Singing Voice Handicap Index-10 (SVHI-10) into Kannada language.

Study design: Cross-sectional Comparative study design.

Methods: The English version of SVHI-10 was translated into Kannada using standard procedure. A total of 115 singers participated in the study, including 90 singers with no voice problems (control group) and 25 singers with voice problems. The internal consistency, test-retest reliability, clinical validity, and cutoff points were calculated.

Results: Kannada SVHI-10 has excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The singers with voice problems scored significantly higher than the singers with no voice problems (t = -14.67, df = 113, P < 0.001). The optimal cutoff point of the SVHI-10 was 9.5 with a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 84%.

Conclusion: The Kannada SVHI-10 is a reliable and clinically valid tool to assess the self-reported singing voice handicap among singers. It can also be used as a quick screening tool for distinguishing singers with and without voice problems as per client's perception.

Journal of Voice, 2019, Vol 33, Pg 582.e1-582.e4

Adaptation and validation of the Malayalam pediatric voice handicap index

25-05-2015 Devadas, D. Dhanya, M. Gunjawate, D.R.

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to adapt and validate the English version of pediatric voice handicap index (pVHI) into Malayalam language.

METHODS: The English version of pediatric voice handicap index was translated into Malayalam language using parallel back translation. The translated version was content validated by three qualified speech language pathologists. The content familiarity was carried out by 10 parents of children with voice problems. This was distributed to 136 parents (57 parents of children with dysphonia, 79 parents of children with no voice problems). The internal consistency and test--retest reliability was determined using Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient. Independent sample t-test was used to assess the difference in means. Kappa coefficient was used to determine the correlation between overall severity of the problem and total pVHI. Discriminant analysis was used to identify thresholds for differentiating between normal and dysphonic participants.

RESULTS: The results obtained revealed that the Malayalam version of pVHI has an excellent internal consistency; total (α=0.974), functional (α=0.922), physical (α=0.953), and emotional (α=0.923). There was an excellent test-retest reliability; total (r=0.937), functional (r=0.954), physical (r=0.95), and emotional (r=0.929). The prediction probability of the dysphonics is 98.2% using the discriminant score function.

CONCLUSIONS: The translated and validated pVHI tool can be effectively used in the assessment of children with voice problems. It can provide a better insight into the parents' perception of their child's voice problems.

International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 2015, Vol 79 (9), Pg 1425-1428

Exploring attitudes of Indian classical singers towards seeking vocal health care

17-12-2015 Gunjawate, D.R. Aithal, U.V. Guddattu, V. Kishore, A. Rajashekhar, B.

OBJECTIVE: The attitude of Indian classical singers toward seeking vocal health care is a dimension yet to be explored. The current study was aimed to determine the attitudes of these singers toward seeking vocal health care and further understand the influence of age and gender.

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional.

METHOD: A 10-item self-report questionnaire adapted from a study on contemporary commercial music singers was used. An additional question was added to ask if the singer was aware about the profession and role of speech-language pathologists (SLPs). The questionnaire was administered on 55 randomly selected self-identified trained Indian classical singers who rated the items using a five-point Likert scale. Demographic variables were summarized using descriptive statistics and t test was used to compare the mean scores between genders and age groups.

RESULTS: Of the singers, 78.2% were likely to see a doctor for heath-related problems, whereas 81.8% were unlikely to seek medical care for voice-related problems; the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Responses for the questions assessing the attitudes toward findings from medical examination by a specialist revealed a statistically significant difference (P = 0.02) between the genders. Age did not have a significant influence on the responses. Only 23.6% of the respondents were aware about the profession and the role of SLPs.

CONCLUSION: The findings are in tune with western literature reporting hesitation of singers toward seeking vocal health care and draws attention of SLPs to promote their role in vocal health awareness and management.

Journal of Voice, 2016, Vol 30(6), Pg 761 e23-761 e26

Prevalence and influencing risk factors of voice problems in priests in Kerala.

22-12-2015 Devadas, U. Jose, N Gunjawate, D.R.

OBJECTIVE: Voice problems are commonly reported by professionals in occupations involving a large amount of voice loading. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of voice problems in Mar Thoma priests and identify possible risk factors responsible for voice problems.

STUDY DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study.

METHOD: The study group consisted of 270 Mar Thoma priests with 1-35 years of professional experience. A self-reported questionnaire was used to collect the data.

RESULTS: Mar Thoma priests were found to have higher career (47.8%) and year prevalence (25.2%) of voice problems with 17.8% of them reporting frequent voice problems during their career. Asthma, allergy and frequent throat clearing behavior were found to have significant association with priests reporting frequent voice problems. Significantly higher number of priests with frequent voice problems missed their work.

CONCLUSION: The study results provide valuable preliminary information regarding the prevalence voice problems and associated risk factors in Mar Thoma priests. However, further investigations are required for in-depth understanding of the types of voice problems these priests experience and their impact on their quality of life.

Journal of Voice, 2016, Vol 30 (6), Pg 771 e27 – 771 e32.

Knowledge and attitude (KA) survey regarding infant hearing loss in Karnataka, India

23-03-2016 Ravi, R Yerraguntla, K. Gunjawate, D.R. Rajashekhar, B. Lewis, L.E.

Introduction: The support provided and the decisions taken by mothers determine the success of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS). Attempts at exploring the existing knowledge-attitude among mothers is crucial to create/modify the existing screening programs. The present study attempts to explore the knowledge and attitude toward infant hearing loss (HL) among mothers of newborns in the Indian state of Karnataka.

Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 219 mothers of newborns in Karnataka, India. The questionnaire was framed from existing literature and consisted of 19 questions assessing knowledge and attitude toward infant HL to be rated on a three-point scale (no, not sure, yes). Descriptive statistics and Cronbach's α were used to analyze the data.

Results: Mothers exhibited good knowledge of risk factors; noise (70.3%) and ear discharge (54.3%). More than 75% agreed that treatment for HL is available and that these children can attend school. The questions of superstitions and cultural beliefs yielded mixed responses. A large number of mothers expressed desire to have their children tested at birth (84.9%) and were concerned about their children's hearing (87.7%). Yet only 54.3% stated that they would allow their children to wear hearing aids.

Summary and conclusion: The present study is an attempt to understand the knowledge and attitude of mothers toward infant HL in Karnataka and facilitate identification of potential areas of less knowledge as a reference for endeavors of enhancement. It further highlights the need for implementing public awareness programs to improve knowledge and attitude of mothers toward infant HL for better implementation of UNHS.

International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 2016, Vol 85, Pg 1-4.

The effect of menstrual cycle on singing voice: A systematic review

24-05-2016 Gunjawate, D.R. Aithal, U.V Ravi R Venkatesh, B.T.

OBJECTIVE: Research has reported the difference in a woman's voice across the different stages of the menstrual cycle. A review of the studies in singers on the influence of menstruation on the singing voice will enable a better understanding of these changes.

METHODS/DESIGN: A systematic literature search was carried out on PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane, and regional electronic databases. The keywords "menstrual cycle," "voice change," and "singer" were used in different combinations. Only those articles that discussed the effect of menstrual cycle on the singing voice were included in the final review.

RESULTS: Six studies in the English language were identified and included in the review. Hormonal variations occur to a great extent during menstrual cycle, and these variations can influence the voice of singers. A great variability was found in the included studies. There are limited studies that have been carried out exploring the relationship between menstrual cycle and the singing voice.

CONCLUSION: Even though the studies included in the review point out toward the changes in the singing voice associated with menstrual cycle, there is a need for more studies to be carried out in diverse singing populations and in different outcome measures.

Journal of Voice, 2017, Vol 31(2), Pg 188 – 194

Professional quality of life in audiologists and speech language pathologists working in India

07-06-2016 Ravi, R Yerraguntla, K Gunjawate, D.R. Guddattu, V Rajashekhar, B.

The study aimed to investigate professional quality of life as reported by audiologists and speech language pathologists (SLPs) working in India. Questionnaire-based cross-sectional e-mail survey design using the Professional Quality of Life scale (ProQOL) was carried out. The sample consisted of professionals registered under the Indian Speech and Hearing Association. The questionnaire was sent through the personal registered e-mail-id to 500 professionals of which 155 complete responses were obtained. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the demographic variables. Internal consistency was checked using Cronbach’s alpha. Independent sample t test was used to check the relation of occupation, gender and work setting with the ProQOL subscales. ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD was performed to determine the effect of years of experience. A statistically significant difference was found between occupation and secondary traumatic stress (STS) levels and years of work experience and burnout. Post hoc analysis revealed a significant difference between 11 and 20 and more than 21 years of experience. Strong negative correlation between compassion satisfaction and burnout whereas a moderate positive correlation between burnout and STS was observed. The study identifies factors such as occupation type and years of experience have an influence on the professional quality of life.

Journal of Workplace Behavioural Health, 2016, Vol 31 (3), Pg 162- 172.

Evaluation of singing vocal health in Yakshagana singers

25-07-2016 Gunjawate, D.R. Aithal, U.V. Devadas, U. Guddattu, V.

INTRODUCTION: Yakshagana, a popular traditional folk art from Karnataka, India, includes singing and dancing. Yakshagana singer or Bhagavata plays an important role in singing and conducting the performance. The present study aims to assess the singing vocal health using Singing Voice Handicap Index-10 (SVHI-10) in these singers and to compare between those who report voice problem and those who do not.

METHOD: A cross-sectional study was carried out on 26 Bhagavata using demographic questionnaire and SVHI-10 in the Kannada language. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the data. Independent sample t test was used to compare the responses for demographic variables between the two groups of singers with and without voice problems. The difference in scores of SVHI-10 between the two groups was analyzed using Pearson's chi-square test.

RESULTS: Of the Bhagavata, 38% reported to have experienced voice problems, which affected their singing, with higher total SVHI-10 score (31.2 ± 5.7) compared with those who did not report any problems (16.81 ± 9.56). A statistically significant difference between the groups was noted in the emotional domain and total scores.

CONCLUSION: The present study provides preliminary information on the voice handicap reported by Bhagavata. The singers reporting voice problems scored higher on SVHI-10. A healthy singing voice is essential for Yakshagana singers, and voice problems can have a significant impact on their performance and livelihood. Hence, results of the present study indicate the need to understand these singers' voice problems and their impact more comprehensively, and educate them about voice care.

Journal of Voice, 2017, Vol 31(2), Pg. 253 e13 – 253 e16

Knowledge and attitude of parents/caregivers towards newborn hearing loss – A systematic review.

15-08-2016 Ravi R Gunjawate, D.R. Yerraguntla, K. Lewis, L.E. Rajashekhar, B.

Objective: The parents/caregivers of a newborn play a pivotal role in the process of hearing screening and intervention. The decisions taken by them depend on their knowledge and attitude. The purpose of this study was to review the literature systematically on knowledge and attitude of parents/caregivers towards infant hearing loss and newborn hearing screening. Design: A systematic search was conducted using electronic databases for the periods from 1990 to March 2016. Two authors scrutinized the studies and extracted the data based on predetermined criteria.

Study sample: Ten studies.

Results: Ear discharge was correctly identified as a risk factor for hearing loss along with measles, drugs/medication, family history, congenital causes and noise exposure. The studies revealed mixed results for knowledge about newborn hearing screening. Overall, the parents/caregivers showed positive attitudes towards hearing screening and intervention options. However, due to heterogeneity in the studies, it’s hard to derive a conclusion. Conclusions: The present review sheds light on the common areas of misconception among parents/caregivers about risk factors of infant hearing loss and newborn hearing screening. The review also draws attention to the need to have more studies exploring this knowledge and attitude of parents/caregivers among diverse populations.

International Journal of Audiology, 2016, Vol 55(12), Pg 715-722

Follow-up in newborn hearing screening – A systematic review

27-08-2016 Ravi R Gunjawate, D.R. Yerraguntla, K. Lewis, L.E. Driscoll, C Rajashekhar, B.

Introduction: The quality and efficiency of newborn hearing screening programs (NHS) rely heavily on appropriate follow-up. The Joint Committee on Infant Hearing recommends a follow-up rate of more than 95% of infants who fail the initial hearing screening. However, a 70% benchmark is considered to be more feasible. This high loss to follow-up (LTF) rate acts as a threat to the overall success of NHS programs. The objective of the study was to identify and examine the reported rates of LTF, attributed reasons for LTF and strategies undertaken to reduce LTF.

Methods: Using a systematic search, articles published between 2005 to December 2015 were identified from PubMed/Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), Scopus, Ovid, ProQuest, and Cochrane Library. To be included in the review, the study should be exploring the loss to follow-up or drop-out rate in newborn hearing screening programs and be published in an indexed peer-reviewed journal in the English language. The main outcome measures were overall rate of LTF, factors leading to LTF and measures adopted to overcome LTF.

Results: 53 articles were short-listed for data extraction. Out of these, 27 were single-centre studies, 19 were multi-centre, 3 compared multiple databases, and 4 used survey-based methods. Overall LTF rates of 20% in single-centre and 21% in multiple-centre studies were observed. Educational disparity and lack of adequate knowledge among parents were associated with LTF. The most commonly used strategy to overcome LTF suggested by studies was the use of an adequate data management system.

Conclusion: This review is a novel attempt to explore the LTF among NHS studies, reasons for LTF and strategies to reduce LTF. This review can act as a basis for planning and execution of effective NHS programs.

International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 2016, Vol 90, Pg 29-36

Validation of Kannada version of the Singing Voice Handicap Index.

29-11-2016 Gunjawate, D.R. Aithal, U.V Guddattu, V. Rajashekhar, B.

OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to adapt and validate the Singing Voice Handicap Index (SVHI) into Kannada language using standard procedures.

STUDY DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study.

METHODS: The original English version of SVHI was translated into Kannada. It was administered on 106 Indian classical singers, of whom 22 complained of voice problems. Its internal consistency was determined using Cronbach's alpha coefficient (α), test-retest reliability using Pearson's product moment correlation and paired t test, and the difference in mean scores by independent sample t test.

RESULTS: The results revealed that the Kannada SVHI exhibited an excellent internal consistency (α = 0.96) with a high item-to-total correlation. Further, excellent test-retest reliability (r = 0.99) and significant differences in SVHI scores were also obtained by singers with and without a voice problem (t = 12.93, df = 104, P = 0.005).

CONCLUSION: The Kannada SVHI is a valid and reliable tool for self-reported assessment of singers with voice problems. It will provide a valuable insight into the singing-related voice problems as perceived by the singers themselves.

Journal of Voice, 2017, Vol 31(4), Pg 507.e7-507 e11.

A national survey of knowledge, attitude, and practices among pediatricians toward newborn hearing screening In India.

30-01-2017 Ravi, R Gunjawate, D.R Yerraguntla, K. Lewis, L.E. Rajashekhar, B

INTRODUCTION: Pediatricians have a key role in ensuring that infant has undergone hearing screening and required follow-up. Attempts in various countries and centers have been made at exploring their knowledge, attitude and practices towards universal newborn hearing screening. In India, such a program is at its preliminary stage, and hence a need was felt to study this aspect in pediatricians working in India.

METHOD: A cross-sectional online survey was carried out among 112 pediatricians working in India. The questionnaire was framed after reviewing the existing questionnaires. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the findings.

RESULTS: A response rate of 7.99% (112/1402) was obtained of which only 20.5% reported of availability of screening program in their work set-up. The majority of the pediatricians (95%) were aware of the newborn hearing screening while 98.3% were affirmative about the importance of screening of all infants. Very few pediatricians reported of a screening program in their set-up or in their close locality. Overall the pediatricians were confident about their knowledge on this topic yet expressed a need to know more about several intricacies about hearing screening. The pediatricians also provided an input on the most preferred method of receiving more information.

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION: The success of the universal newborn hearing screening program lies in the support and cooperation of health care providers such as pediatricians. The present study draws attention to the positive attitude and practices exhibited by them. It also sheds light on the knowledge gaps that are present and need the due attention of the policy makers. Further, it highlights the need for having more continuing medical education program and awareness drives for ensuring a better implementation of UNHS.

International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 2017, Vol 95, Pg. 9-14

Speech language pathologist’s knowledge of genetics – An Indian perspective.

31-01-2017 Ravi, R. Yerraguntla, K. Gunjawate, D.R. Ayas, M

Background and Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine the knowledge, attitudes and confidence levels about genetics among speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in India; and further to identify the relationship between knowledge, attitudes and confidence levels.

Methods: A cross-sectional study design was implemented to carry out an email-based survey to assess the knowledge, attitudes and confidence levels about genetics among SLP’s in India. Results: Responses from 121 SLP’s working with pediatric population were analyzed. Results suggested that 70.3% of responses were correct for the genetic knowledge based questions. The confidence levels and attitudes were in the medium categories. The primary sources of learning were from school lesson as reported by the professionals. There existed a positive correlation between knowledge index and the mean attitude and confidence levels.

Conclusion: The findings of the present study add valuable information to international literature and provides suggestions towards increasing more topics related genetics into the curricula.

Online Journal of Health and Allied Sciences, 2017, 15 (4), 10.

Audiology Occupational Stress experienced by Audiologists practicing in India

19-11-2014 Ravi, R Gunjawate, D.R. Mohd. A.

Objective: The aim of the present study is to identify the levels of occupational stress across different types of setting, years of experience, and age.

Design: A questionnaire-based observational research design using the audiology occupational stress questionnaire (AOSQ) was used.

Study sample: The sample comprised of audiologists registered under the Indian Speech and Hearing Association. The questionnaire was sent via personal email to 400 audiologists, of which 100 responded.

Results: Descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis were carried out. Participants in both the groups experienced stress to some extent, with more stress reported in private practitioners. Conclusion: This study helps to identify certain factors that contribute towards work-related stress. These in turn have an impact on the overall professional output of a professional.

International Journal of Audiology, 2015, Vol 54(2), Pg 131-135

Acoustic analysis of Madhya and Taar Saptak/Sthayi in Indian Classical singers

19-05-2015 Folia Phoniatrica et Logopedia, 2015, Vol 67(1), Pg 36-41 Gunjawate, D.R Aithal, U.V Guddattu, V. Rajashekhar, B

Objectives: We aimed to compare the acoustic parameters of voice between Madhya Saptak/Sthayi (MS) and Taar Saptak/Sthayi (TS) in trained Indian classical singers and between males and females.

Participants and Method: Sixty-five adult trained Indian classical singers were instructed to produce MS and TS; the acoustic parameters were analyzed with the Multidimensional Voice Program. Descriptive statistics were used for analysis across tasks and gender. Two-way random-effects ANOVA was used to test the effect of gender and task.

Results: Male participants had a restricted range of fundamental frequency (F0), especially at high pitches. The acoustic analysis showed a statistically significant difference for F0 measures, range of F0, jitter and pitch perturbation quotient between males and females during MS and TS.

Conclusion: The use of TS, that is, high-pitch phonation, during the clinical evaluation of singers enables an understanding of their vocal behavior in the higher scales of singing.

    SAVE YOUR VOICE BEFORE YOU LOOSE YOUR VOICE!! - Udyavani- Arogyavani

    2018-01-04

    “The greatest musical instrument given to a human being is the VOICE” – Swami Dayanand Saraswati As rightly said by Swami Dayanand Saraswati, indeed the human voice is the most complex yet beautiful instrument that we have been gifted with. It acts a mirror to our emotional states and well-being. Thus, in many instances we can identify the emotional state that a person is going through based on their voice; be in angry, sad, or terrified. Our voice holds a very important position in our lives which is often taken for granted. The World Voice Day is celebrated worldwide on April 16th to increase global awareness about voice, voice problems and remediation options. Several individuals are dependent on their voice for a source of living. Any individual whose voice is essential and a basic requirement of their job is called as an occupational/professional voice user. These include actors, singers, teachers, drama artists, salespersons, lawyers, priests, call center workers, etc. These professionals are at a great risk of developing a voice disorder due to heavy demands they place on their voice. Further, even a minor deviation in their voice can have a significant impact on them. Sadly, in most cases these individuals are unaware about their voice problems and consider voice change as a part and parcel of their job. They continue to overuse, misuse and abuse their voice for professional and social needs. Often they seek help from voice experts after a very long time since the onset of the problem. A voice disorder is said to exist when the voice quality, loudness or flexibility differs from other individuals of the same age, gender or profession. The causes of voice problem include over use, abuse or misuse of voice. The vocal abusive behaviors include behaviors which when used in excess can lead to vocal fold injury such as excessive talking, throat clearing, screaming, smoking and excessive coughing. Vocal misuse includes abnormal voice usage thereby causing injury to the vocal folds such as speaking loudly, singing at wrong pitch or loudness. Environmental factors include smoke, dehydration, fumes, pollution, allergic pathogens can also trigger voice problems. The other causes include infections, allergies, gastroesophageal reflux, hormonal disorders, cancerous and non- cancerous vocal fold lesions. If you or anyone you know is experiencing any of these symptoms; consult a speech language pathologist/voice therapist at the earliest: • Change in voice quality/hoarseness • Vocal fatigue/tiredness • Dryness in throat • Pain in throat • Sore throat • Weak voice or inability to speak at all • Voice breaks while speaking • Feeling of tightness in throat • Discomfort while speaking • Reduced pitch and loudness • Change in voice quality after prolonged speaking • Excessive effort needed to talk • Frequent desire to clear throat

    Giving voice to the person inside Role of speech therapist in transgender voice therapy - - Udyavani- Arogyavani

    11/08/2019

    Voice is a medium of social verbal communication, a feature unique to human beings. It acts as a source of identity for a person. Our voice holds a very important position in our lives and is often taken for granted. The human voice is the most complex yet beautiful instrument and acts a mirror to our emotional states and well-being. The voice of a person reflects his self-confidence and self-esteem as well acts as a means for social acceptance. The quality and pitch of voice share a strong link with the gender of an individual. The term transgender includes individuals who have a gender identity or expression that is different from the sex assigned at birth. This community faces considerable amount of discrimination by the society. They have to tackle several challenges such as body related, psychological (depression, low self-esteem, anxiety), social (lack of equal opportunities, discrimination) and legal (lack of equal rights) and cultural (stigma and beliefs). These issues can have an impact on their quality of life. The mismatch between gender identity and the sex they are born with, leads to a lot of distress. Female to male (FTM) and male to female (MTF) are the two main categories of transgender. In order to bridge the mismatch, these individuals undergo several social and medical transitions. One such area is the need to change their voice to match it to their changed appearance. Transgender people need assistance to make their speech and voice masculine or feminine. Speech/Voice therapy helps to provide assistance for making speech and voice feminine/masculine as well as aspects of nonverbal communication. Voice feminization therapy aims at changing a male sounding voice to a female sounding voice while male masculinization is changing voice from feminine to masculine. Communication norms are established for males and females, which are considered as typical features for a particular gender. These include high pitch voice for female while a low pitch voice for male as well as softer and clear speaking style for females compared to males. Further, differences in body language, hand gestures, distance from speaker, eye contact and smiling differentiate a female from male. Transgender voice therapy also focuses on these aspects of communication. These changes helps to facilitate a better presentation of gender, which in turn boosts the self-esteem, well-being and quality of life. Voice therapy for transgender population is available which would help them to be a part of the society. A speech language pathologist/voice therapist is a certified professional trained for assessing and managing this population. The therapist provides the required treatment without being discriminative or critical about the population. Every year, 16th of April is globally celebrated as ‘World Voice Day’. The motive behind this day is to increase awareness among the public about the importance of voice. The theme for this year is ‘Be kind with your voice’. On this World Voice day, let us all aim to be kind with our own voice as well towards this community. This will help them to find their voice and lead a happier life.

    Giving voice to the person inside Role of speech therapist in transgender voice therapy

    11th August 2019, Arogyavani, Udyavani

    Voice is a medium of social verbal communication, a feature unique to human beings. It acts as a source of identity for a person. Our voice holds a very important position in our lives and is often taken for granted. The human voice is the most complex yet beautiful instrument and acts a mirror to our emotional states and well-being. The voice of a person reflects his self-confidence and self-esteem as well acts as a means for social acceptance. The quality and pitch of voice share a strong link with the gender of an individual. The term transgender includes individuals who have a gender identity or expression that is different from the sex assigned at birth. This community faces considerable amount of discrimination by the society. They have to tackle several challenges such as body related, psychological (depression, low self-esteem, anxiety), social (lack of equal opportunities, discrimination) and legal (lack of equal rights) and cultural (stigma and beliefs). These issues can have an impact on their quality of life. The mismatch between gender identity and the sex they are born with, leads to a lot of distress. Female to male (FTM) and male to female (MTF) are the two main categories of transgender. In order to bridge the mismatch, these individuals undergo several social and medical transitions. One such area is the need to change their voice to match it to their changed appearance. Transgender people need assistance to make their speech and voice masculine or feminine. Speech/Voice therapy helps to provide assistance for making speech and voice feminine/masculine as well as aspects of nonverbal communication. Voice feminization therapy aims at changing a male sounding voice to a female sounding voice while male masculinization is changing voice from feminine to masculine. Communication norms are established for males and females, which are considered as typical features for a particular gender. These include high pitch voice for female while a low pitch voice for male as well as softer and clear speaking style for females compared to males. Further, differences in body language, hand gestures, distance from speaker, eye contact and smiling differentiate a female from male. Transgender voice therapy also focuses on these aspects of communication. These changes helps to facilitate a better presentation of gender, which in turn boosts the self-esteem, well-being and quality of life. Voice therapy for transgender population is available which would help them to be a part of the society. A speech language pathologist/voice therapist is a certified professional trained for assessing and managing this population. The therapist provides the required treatment without being discriminative or critical about the population. Every year, 16th of April is globally celebrated as ‘World Voice Day’. The motive behind this day is to increase awareness among the public about the importance of voice. The theme for this year is ‘Be kind with your voice’. On this World Voice day, let us all aim to be kind with our own voice as well towards this community. This will help them to find their voice and lead a happier life.